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How to find a replacement driver

Finding a great replacement driver (woofer, mid-range, tweeter, compression driver, etc.) can help you save lots when repairing or upgrading your existing home audio system or pro audio installation.

This guide is by no means an exhaustive list but can be useful in finding a suitable replacement driver.


Impedance - Before you continue with the following steps you should first find out the impedance of the drivers themselves. Often times they will be 8 ohm in traditional loudspeakers but they may be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 or 32+ ohm. The easiest way to find out would to look for a sticker or stamp on the back of the cabinet or use a multimeter (guide).

Woofers (Subwoofers included)

Measure from the centre of the bolt hole to centre of the bolt hole across the driver. (BCD aka PCD)
Measure the diameter of the hole in the cabinet/enclosure/box that the driver fits into. (Baffle hole)
If the cabinet/enclosure/box is ported (vented) look for a Qts value close to 0.4 or lower. If it is a sealed cabinet/enclosure/box look for a Qts value above 0.5. *Optional
If possible look to see what your frequency response range is which is often located on the back of the cabinet/enclosure. *Optional but recommended
ex. If it states 40 Hz to 20kHz then ensure your woofer or subwoofer has a range close to 40 Hz or lower. The 20Hz would be the high frequency driver's max range.
Find a driver in home audio speakers or pro audio speakers category that has a similar impedance diameter, BCD and which has a baffle hole diameter equal to or smaller than your measured baffle hole in yours. Ideally look for a wattage rating that is at least 2/3 of what your amp is outputting per channel.
Feel free to contact us if you have any additional questions.

Mid-Range Drivers (AKA Mids)

Measure from the centre of the bolt hole to centre of the bolt hole across the driver. (BCD aka PCD)
Measure the diameter of hole in the cabinet/enclosure/box that the driver fits into. (Baffle hole)
If you can find the upper frequency range of the woofer (LF) in your enclosure, make sure that the mid-range driver's lower frequency is below the crossover's mid range frequency cut off point.
If you can find the frequency range of the tweeter or compression driver in your enclosure, make sure that the mid-range driver you choose has some a high end frequency response slightly over your crossover's cut off point (3-way).
Find a driver in home audio speakers or pro audio speakers category that has a similar impedance diameter, BCD and which has a baffle hole diameter equal to or smaller than your measured baffle hole in yours. Ideally look for a wattage rating that is at least 2/3 of what your amp is outputting per channel.
Feel free to contact us if you have any additional questions.

Tweeters and Compression Drivers

Measure the diameter or size of the hole in the cabinet/enclosure/box that the tweeter or compression drivers fits into. (Baffle hole)
Compression Drivers (Bolt-on): Measure the BCD as seen in the photo across the span of the driver for a 2, 3, or 4 bolt configuration. That will be your bolt circle diameter.

Measure the opening in the compression driver. This will be your throat exit diameter.

Compression Drivers (Screw-on): Measure the thread width and this will be your mounting thread width necessary.
Find a tweeter in our home audio or pro audio catalog that has a similar size and - if known - sensitivity rating within 3 dB of yours if possible.
Feel free to contact us if you have any additional questions.

Caveats


  • You may be able to modify the baffle hole to fit a larger woofer, mid range or tweeter.
  • If you cannot match the impedance you may use a new driver with a higher impedance but shouldn't use one with a lower impedance.
  • i.e. It's acceptable if you are replacing a 4 ohm driver with an 8 ohm driver but you shouldn't put in a 4 ohm driver where an 8 ohm driver was originally used unless the crossover has a jumper/option for 4 ohms.